TASTE THE GOOD AT LONDON COFFEE FESTIVAL

Table talker

Today, The Fairtrade Foundation is launching a range of new marketing materials at London Coffee Festival (7-10 April).

The materials can be used by any businesses selling Fairtrade coffee to highlight the positive impact that buying Fairtrade has on farmer’s lives.

The new ‘Taste the good in your coffee’ slogan will be displayed at the event, where The Fairtrade Foundation will showcase some of its best quality coffee from four co-operatives and four brands: Starbucks, AMT, Cafédirect and EAT.

Over the past three years, 28 Fairtrade coffees have won Great Taste Awards in the UK, and many farmers’ co-operatives have also achieved international accolades, thanks to investments of at least 10million euros per year in quality improvement.  

Anna Pierides, Coffee Product Manager at Fairtrade Foundation, says:

“As London continues to gain a reputation for having one of the coolest, most innovative and specialist coffee industries, we are excited to showcase what Fairtrade’s commitment to quality has achieved. Our new ‘Taste the good in your coffee’ marketing materials celebrate Fairtrade’s award-winning farmers who have overcome huge challenges to keep improving their coffee beans, so they can deliver for a competitive, international market that demands the best.”

Fairtrade Coffee farmer Ivania Calderón Peralta, who runs a family farm in Nicaragua, has seen Fairtrade Premium profits from her coffee co-operative’s sales invested back into their businesses with machinery, a new tasting laboratory and training. “These new facilities and tools have helped us process coffee beans faster and better,” says Ivania.

The marketing campaign also highlights Fairtrade’s impact on farmers’ lives, with Fairtrade’s Premium benefitting farmers’ communities and Fairtrade’s Minimum Price providing security at a time when the market price for coffee has remained stubbornly low for the past eight months.

Ivania and other farmers in her community have received training to develop their resilience against plant disease La Roya and the effects of climate change, which are destroying crops and threatening to put farmers out of business across Latin America. Ivania adds: “We have a better future because of Fairtrade. My hope is that we will continue to sell more and more Fairtrade certified coffee.”

The new ‘Taste the good in your coffee’ Point of Sale, posters, postcards and table talkers are available to order via Fairtrade’s website (http://shop.fairtrade.org.uk/for-business)

For further information contact: 

Susannah Henty

Media and PR Manager

020 7440 8597

susannah.henty@fairtrade.org.uk

NOTES TO EDITORS

When farmers sell their coffee on Fairtrade terms, they earn at least the Fairtrade Minimum Price of $1.40 per pound or $1.90 per pound for organic coffee, which provides a vital safety net when market prices fall. For the past eight months, the average market prices have been below the Fairtrade Minimum Price and currently remain at just $1.20 per pound. In addition, Fairtrade farmer co-operatives receive an extra Fairtrade Premium of 20 cents per pound which is invested in projects to improve their businesses and communities.

In 2014, 445 coffee producer organisations, representing more than 812,000 small-scale farmers, in 30 countries were Fairtrade-certified. These organisations are required to invest at least 25% of the Fairtrade Premium in improving coffee quality and productivity. In 2013–14, coffee farmer co-operatives received a total Fairtrade Premium equivalent to more than €49 million (£39.4m).

Fairtrade coffee is increasingly being sold into the speciality coffee market; 70% of Fairtrade production is quality washed Arabica and 40% is organic and having these double premiums can help farmers attract higher prices.

About the Fairtrade Foundation

The Fairtrade Foundation is an independent certification body which licenses the use of the FAIRTRADE Mark on products which meet international Fairtrade standards. This independent consumer label appears on products to show that disadvantaged producers are getting a better deal from trade. Today, more than 1.65 million people – farmers and workers – across more than 74 developing countries benefit from the international Fairtrade system.

Over 5,000 products have been licensed to carry the FAIRTRADE Mark in the UK including coffee, tea, herbal teas, chocolate, cocoa, sugar, bananas, grapes, pineapples, mangoes, avocados, apples, pears, plums, grapefruit, lemons, oranges, satsumas, clementines, mandarins, lychees, dried fruit, juices, smoothies, biscuits, cakes & snacks, honey, jams & preserves, chutney, rice, quinoa, herbs & spices, seeds, nuts, wines, ales, rum, confectionery, muesli, cereal bars, ice-cream, flowers, sports balls, sugar body scrub and cotton products including clothing, homeware, cotton wool, olive oil, gold, silver and platinum.

Awareness of the FAIRTRADE Mark continues to be high in 2014, at a level of 78%. Estimated retail sales of Fairtrade products in 2015 exceeded £1.6  billion.