Haiti Appeal

Help Haiti’s cocoa, coffee and mango farmers rebuild their lives after the devastation of Hurricane Matthew, the country's biggest humanitarian crisis since the earthquake in 2010.

The Fairtrade Foundation is working in partnership with the CLAC (Coordinadora Latinoamericana y del Caribe de Pequeños Productores y Trabajadores de Comercio Justo) to deliver relief to some of the most seriously affected farmers in Haiti. 

The CLAC is the Latin American and Caribbean Network of Fair Trade Small Producers and Workers that represents small-scale farmer co-operatives and worker associations in the Fairtrade movement.

Three co-operatives in south-west Haiti have been identified as the most gravely impacted by the hurricane: ASPVEFS (Association des Producteurs-Vendeurs de Fruits du Sud) a mango co-operative with 1,285 members; CACVA (Cooperative Agricole Cafeiere de Vachon), a coffee co-operative with 420 members; and CAUD (Cooperative Agricole Union Developpement), a cocoa co-operative with 1,015 members. They have suffered extensive damage, with CLAC’s staff on the ground reporting 3,714 cattle dead, 1,545 roofs demolished, 436 houses destroyed and 70 percent of farmers still using temporary shelters at night.

Your donation will help hundreds of farmers in these co-operatives who have been most seriously affected. They have been left without shelter, livestock and vital crops, and are short of food, income and a means to provide for their families. 

  • £10 could provide a kit of essentials like soap and clean water tablets 
  • £40 could provide a food package to feed a family for a week
  • £50 could provide materials and tools for rebuilding a roof
  • £100 could provide seeds for food crops, fertiliser and tools

Fairtrade is all about supporting farmers to work their way out of poverty. But when a disaster like Hurricane Matthew strikes, everyone needs a helping hand. 

Please support farmers in Haiti with a gift so that they can rebuild everything they've worked so hard for.

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FAQs

How will my donation be spent?

Your donation will go to coffee, cocoa and mango farmers in Haiti who are working with Fairtrade and have been most seriously affected by Hurricane Matthew. It will be spent on food and sanitation packs to help those still struggling, and buy building materials, tools and seeds so that homes can be rebuilt and farms can be replanted. Your donation will support hundreds of farmers and their families to rebuild their lives.  

How do I know my donation will go directly to farmers most in need? 

For this appeal, the Fairtrade Foundation is working in partnership with the CLAC (Coordinadora Latinoamericana y del Caribe de Pequeños Productores y Trabajadores de Comercio Justo) to co-ordinate relief to some of the most seriously affected farmers in Haiti. The CLAC is the Latin American and Caribbean Network of Fair Trade Small Producers and Workers that represents small-scale farmer co-operatives and worker associations in the Fairtrade movement.
As the CLAC works directly with farming co-operatives in Haiti, they know which farmers are most in need and will ensure relief reaches them as quickly as possible.

Three co-operatives in south-west Haiti have been identified as the most gravely impacted by the hurricane: ASPVEFS (Association des Producteurs-Vendeurs de Fruits du Sud) a mango co-operative with 1,285 members; CACVA (Cooperative Agricole Cafeiere de Vachon), a coffee co-operative with 420 members; and CAUD (Cooperative Agricole Union Developpement), a cocoa co-operative with 1,015 members. They have suffered extensive damage, with CLAC’s staff on the ground reporting 3,714 cattle dead, 1,545 roofs demolished, 436 houses destroyed and 70 percent of farmers still using temporary shelters at night.

Are these farmers part of Fairtrade? 

There are three farmers’ organisations that CLAC has identified as seriously affected by the hurricane: ASPVEFS (Association des Producteurs-Vendeurs de Fruits du Sud) a mango co-operative with 1,285 members; CACVA (Cooperative Agricole Cafeiere de Vachon), a coffee co-operative with 420 members; and CAUD (Cooperative Agricole Union Developpement), a cocoa co-operative with 1,015 members. All three of these organisations work with Fairtrade, however only CAUD is currently certified. ASPVEFS and CACVA's certifications have lapsed for a variety of reasons stemming from the major impact of the 2010 earthquake, which they are still recovering from. If they can rebuild and secure market access, they may work towards Fairtrade certification again. Nevertheless they still have a close relationship with the CLAC and with other Fairtrade certified co-operatives in their area. We believe it is important to support the most affected members of all three co-operatives as their communities are closely linked.

Why are you running an appeal over two months after Hurricane Matthew hit? Isn’t it a bit late? 

As is so often the case, despite a disaster no longer being in the news, the need for support in affected communities does not disappear overnight. Hurricane Matthew is Haiti’s biggest humanitarian crisis since the 2010 earthquake. The category 4 hurricane caused serious and widespread damage. Those in rural areas have been seriously affected and have also been the hardest to reach as transport and communication networks have been badly damaged. It has taken time for the extent of the impact on farming co-operatives to be assessed. Working in partnership with the CLAC, who have employees working on the ground in Haiti, we know that three farming co-operatives have been very seriously affected and are still urgently in need of basic supplies like food and healthcare essentials. They also need building materials, tools and seeds to help them rebuild their homes and farms and provide for themselves again. This is why we are running the appeal now. 

Isn’t Fairtrade about trade not aid? Why are you asking for donations?

‘Trade not aid’ is a commonly used phrase that embodies Fairtrade's approach. We work to ensure that farmers and workers can earn more through improved terms of trade, enabling them to provide for their families and invest in their futures. But when disasters like Hurricane Matthew strike, their devastation is so great that without a helping hand farmers do not have a hope of rebuilding their farms and livelihoods. We’re asking for donations so that we can help Haitian farmers rebuild everything they’ve worked for, so they can start earning a living and providing for themselves and their families again.