Fairtrade Blog

  • Cocoa farmers

    Decent work and a decent income. It’s not much to ask, is it?

    6 July 2019 by Gelkha Buitrago, Director of Standards and Pricing, Fairtrade International

    There’s a saying in English: "the whole is greater than the sum of its parts". Put simply, this means that when people collaborate, they can often achieve more than if each person were to work on their own.

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  • Fairtrade coffee farmer

    There is only one way out of the global coffee crisis... Pay more.

    2 July 2019 by Darío Soto Abril, CEO, Fairtrade International and Roberto Vélez, CEO, Colombian Coffee Growers Federation (FNC)

    The global coffee industry is facing an unprecedented price crisis which not only threatens our daily cup of the black stuff but also - far more importantly - jeopardises the livelihoods of millions of small-scale growers around the world. 

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  • Cocoa farmer in Ivory Coast

    Competition Law Fears - The Hidden Barrier to Living Income

    22 April 2019 by David Taylor

    We report on a recent Fairtrade roundtable where business, academia and NGOs met to debate whether competition law is blocking progress towards a living income for cocoa farmers.

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  • Lord Bates, Will Quince and Awa Traore

    Fairtrade's Living Income Campaign in Parliament

    22 April 2019 by Helen Dennis

    You’d be forgiven for thinking that the only topic in parliament at the moment is Brexit. True, it is taking up lots of time, but it isn’t the only subject under discussion. There have also been opportunities for MPs to raise questions about the new Fairtrade cocoa campaign – She Deserves A Living Income!

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  • Cocoa farm in Ivory Coast

    Our campaign for a fair cocoa trade is just beginning

    13 March 2019 by Mike Gidney

    One of the most inspiring aspects of Fairtrade is how much young people support the cause. Perhaps it’s because the concept of fairness is well understood in every playground; perhaps because children expect those in authority to defend abuses of power; or having grown up with social media, they are the generation most connected with the rest of the world.  

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  • Cocoa farmers

    Cheap cocoa is costing farmers dear

    15 October 2018 by Darío Soto-Abril, Global CEO, Fairtrade International

    Shock, frustration and anger. Those were my feelings after seeing a Fairtrade study in Côte d’Ivoire showing that only 12% of cocoa households earn a living income. 

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  • Cocoa Farmer

    How much money do you need to live a decent life?

    8 October 2018 by Heather Nicholson

    In the UK, the national minimum wage in 2018 is set to £7.83 per hour. Daily life, however, is much more expensive than a minimum wage can realistically cover.

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  • Fairtrade farmer in Norandino, Peru

    Did the Commonwealth Summit live up to its promise

    4 May 2018 by Helen Dennis

    The much-anticipated Commonwealth Summit (or ‘CHOGM’) recently took place in London and Windsor – the largest gathering of world leaders ever hosted in the UK.

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  • Fairtrade tea picker

    Do not be fooled! Living Wage benchmarks should reflect real cost of living

    1 April 2016 by Barbara Crowther, Director of Policy and Public Affairs for the Fairtrade Foundation

    Today, 1 April 2016, the new Government set minimum wage level for over 25s comes into force, in a rebranding exercise that now calls it a National Living Wage.

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  • living wage

    The need for wage rich prices

    18 December 2014 by Wilbert Flinterman, Senior Advisor on Workers’ Rights and Trade Union Relations at Fairtrade International, and Tim Aldred, Head of Policy and Research at Fairtrade Foundation (UK).

    In 1819, UK MPs were debating a new law to outlaw the employment of very young children as chimney sweeps. Several MPs (apparently after lobbying from the Guild of Master Chimney Sweepers) raised concerns that sweepers would turn to mechanisation. They argued that the law would “deprive many people of employment, and throw a number of young persons on the parishes.”1  Better, said the opponents, to employ a large number of children - in very poor working conditions, than to offer them no work at all.

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