Our Patrons and Ambassadors

Our patrons and ambassadors actively support Fairtrade with a view of delivering greater benefits to producers in the developing world. 

We are proud to have the support of a number of passionate, high-profile supporters, who fit the championing of Fairtrade values to a wide audience into their busy lives.

The Patron role exists to add gravitas and influence to the Fairtrade Foundation’s work in connecting disadvantaged producers and consumers, promoting fairer trading conditions and empowering producers to combat poverty. It requires the patron to attend some events in the Fairtrade Foundation’s calendar, support for communications materials such as providing forwards for publications such as our annual report and major funding applications. The position of Patron is voluntary, but all out of pocket operating and travel expenses are paid.

Our celebrity ambassadors promote our work as widely as possible alongside their day jobs.

Our Patrons

Allegra McEvedy

Allegra McEvedy

Allegra visited the tea and nut producers of the National Smallholder Farmers’ Association of Malawi with Harriet Lamb in 2008. They travelled around the small country including to the remote area of Mchinji that lies at the far west of Malawi where the Zambian and Mozambique borders meet. She met independent farmers with less than a hectare of land to support themselves and their families. Due to the African Aids epidemic, nearly everyone she met also has adopted orphans, usually anything between one and three, but she did meet one village elder who had 15. Judith Harry, now 38, is a single mother of a teenage girl and looks after two orphans and her mother. Judith told Allegra: "The guaranteed fair price that comes with Fairtrade is important as we make a profit when we sell our nuts and we can use the money to lift up our lives". Allegra was moved to hear that, in Malawi, people have to pay to send children to secondary school and, although primary school is free, uniforms must be purchased or the young pupils risk being turned away.  

Allegra has been an active supporter of Fairtrade ever since, helping at a party to recruit other celebrities later in 2008 and most recently speaking at the Supporter Conference last Autumn.


Adjoa Andoh 

Adjoa Andoh

Adjoa has supported the work of the Fairtrade Foundation since 2005 when she met with Fairtrade producers in London for the annual Fairtrade International meeting and visited supermarkets with them. Starring as Nelson Mandela's Chief of Staff Brenda Mazikubo alongside Morgan Freeman as Mandela in Clint Eastwood's Invictus, Adjoa took the opportunity to visit workers on wine estates supplying the UK Fairtrade market in 2009. For this year’s Fairtrade Fortnight, she organised for some of her actor colleagues, including Roger Lloyd Pack whose TV roles include The Vicar of Dibley and Only Fools and Horses, to visit citrus farmers in Cuba when they were there to perform a Harold Pinter revival for the Havana Theatre Festival.


Archbishop of York, Dr John Sentamu 

Archbishop of York, Dr John Sentamu

Dr Sentamu launched a “chocolate challenge” in 2007, in which he asked consumers “to buy only Fairtrade chocolate from now on”.  He said: “If you can’t find it in your favourite shop, ask to see the manager and say that you will only buy goods which are not produced by slave labour. Say you want to trade fairly. If you keep that promise, you could be playing your part in ending a 21st-century iniquity.”

Since then he has welcomes major chocolate company switches to Fairtrade and visited cocoa farmers in the Ivory Coast to see the difference that Fairtrade is making on the ground. Dr Sentamu was born in 1949 in a village near Kampala, Uganda.


Nick Hewer 

Nick Hewer

Nick has supported Fairtrade since the Fairtrade Foundation’s award-winning Stick With Foncho banana campaign. He visited Fairtrade banana farmers in the Windward islands in 2014 and spoke at the Foundation’s 20th anniversary. Nick appeared as Lord Sugar's adviser on the British television series The Apprentice. Since January 2012, he has presented the Channel 4 programme Countdown with Rachel Riley and Susie Dent. In July 2012, Hewer presented a four-part series on BBC Two called The Farm Fixer, where he assisted farmers in Northern Ireland in diversifying. Hewer also presented two BBC One series The Town that Never Retired and We All Pay Your Benefits with Margaret Mountford.

Nick Hewer says:

“Like many people my first experience of Fairtrade was as a consumer. Picking up my bananas and coffee with that iconic mark on. Buying a Fairtrade product gives you only half the story, it’s only when you meet the farmers, and talk to them about their experiences that you fully appreciate the importance of what Fairtrade does.

“I hope that I can help encourage people to continue to carry the ethos of Fairtrade forward in the future and play their part in making fairness in trade the norm rather than the exception.” 

Our Ambassadors

Tess Ward

Tess Ward

Le Cordon Bleu trained chef, food writer and author, Tess Ward has a passion for healthy, tasty food. Her first cookbook ‘The Naked Diet’ celebrates unprocessed ingredients in delicious dishes. Tess also works as a creative consultant, freelance food and travel writer. Brand partnerships include Fortnum and Mason, Itsu, Grey Goose, Sainsbury’s, Panasonic, Kallo San Miguel, Creme de la Mer and Elizabeth Arden.

From hosting celebrity events to Fairtrade campaign launches, Tess is an active supporter and ambassador for the Fairtrade Foundation.

Tess says on the Growing Women in Coffee project:

"In just three years, this empowering community project has been providing jobs, redefining women’s roles in the community and allowing them to take more control over their lives. It’s an initiative that has my heart as not only are they making award-winning coffee, the project is redefining the social and economic standards for women. I'm so happy to be involved and to be learning about such a wonderful project."


Tom Hunt

Tom Hunt

Tom Hunt is an award-winning chef, food writer, climate change activist and author of The Natural Cook.

He prioritises people and the environment within his work and believes in a world with a fair global food system where our actions benefit other people and nature. Tom works to protect biodiversity and promote equality by raising awareness about the issues affecting our food system whilst empowering people and businesses to act responsibly through his consultancy, collaborations, food writing, presenting and events.

Tom has supported Fairtrade since 2017, getting involved in press events, creating recipes using Fairtrade ingredients and talking publically about why Fairtrade matters. He has travelled to Palestine with the Fairtrade social enterprise Zaytoun to meet Fairtrade olive oil producers and cook with Palestinian chefs.

Tom says:

"Since I was a child I’ve been shocked at how un-Fairtrade food is able to exist. Why aren’t there stricter rules laid down by our government to ensure the fair treatment of the people who make, grow and farm our food?

"The truth is our food system is very complex and it’s certifications like Fairtrade that can help ensure the ethical credibility of imported commodities such as tea, coffee, chocolate and even things like olive oil and nuts. By choosing Fairtrade ingredients where possible you know that the people who produce your food are being paid fairly."

Read Tom Hunt's recipe for a baked almond frangipane

Read about his trip to Palestine to visit Fairtrade olive oil farmers.


Son of Kong

Son of Kong

Full of banana-fuelled energy, Son of Kong teamed up with Fairtrade in 2018 to learn more about Fairtrade bananas and take them on an explosive sound adventure. The collaboration launched this summer at Son of Kong’s live gigs and music festivals across the UK.

They say:

"Bananas are the world’s favourite fruit. We’re enjoying finding out more about the people that grow bananas and the wonderful work Fairtrade does to support their industry and communities. We love to give out bananas to audience members during our shows. It helps to know that for each banana, the farmers are paid a fair price for their hard day’s work and we want to pass on this message alongside our music."